Final Spam

This is my final post to spam my thoughts this semester, and it is about my final day of English class, which included folding origami cranes for our final exam. Later I’ll mention my final experimental recipe with Spam, so this is one big post of finals.

One of the exhibits at the memorial included spamming a bunch of cranes from the ceiling. These origami cranes are supposed to symbolize hope for better tomorrows. Personally, my first crane inspired hope in me for better crane-making skills. This was my first origami crane.

There were a few extra folds because I wasn’t sure exactly how to make the head and tail. Still, I followed the instructions as best I could to make an acceptable crane. I have two more final exams to make Wednesday, but I think this English exam will prove to have been the most difficult. I hope my final crane received a passing grade. It would suck to fail a composition class because of a final exam in which the only writing we did was concealed among the folds of an ornamental crane that will live out its life in the archives of the bombing memorial in Oklahoma City. Then again, our entire class has been on map making, so I suppose it wouldn’t come as such a surprise. Anyway, I’m sure my final crane was an A+ crane. It was pink (the color of Spam, of course), and my hidden message was something like this, though I forget exactly what it was:

Spamming the message to emails across the world so that all will know the consequences of violence.

(signature)

spam spam spam spam

And as promised, this is my latest experiment with Spam:

I don’t know what to call it. I was thinking Spam Surprise! might do. It’s a can of Spam cooked with potatoes, onions, eggs, cheese, corn, rotel, bacon, and some cayenne pepper to spice it up. I think cooking is quickly becoming one of my favorite hobbies.

spam spam spam spam

Spamming the Gratitude: OCU Class

Thank you to all of the Oklahoma City peeps who made our trip possible and memorable! Of course a special thanks goes to Topographia for her dedicated work in keeping her class in correspondence with our own and for giving us great advice and guidance in choosing locations to explore in Oklahoma City. Thanks to every one of the Oklahoma City students for setting the bar. I can’t vouch for all of us at AUM, but I know that for myself, I had a bit of a slow start in this class. With Calculus, Physics, History, and English in the same semester, I had put English on the back burner. It was the class that I would “get back to” after I had finished assignments for my other classes. I wasn’t interested in keeping up with what everyone else was doing, and I certainly wasn’t about to spend all my time sifting through posts of students in a different state to find stuff to spam comments on. Thank you all for changing my mind.

This picture is of my very own Spam Breakfast Bowl. It consists of potatoes, onions, eggs, cheese, and of course Spam. I’m a novice cook, so it took me a few tries to time the addition of each ingredient just right so that no portion would be burnt or undercooked, but after a few blunders and nearly burning my house down a couple of times, this has quickly become my favorite dish to cook for breakfast. I used it for this post because it reminds me very much of my class and the relationships I’ve initiated and fostered with OCU students. I had to balance each element of each of my classes so that I wouldn’t burn out in any of them, but I still needed to make good grades in all of them. I busted a few eggs in the beginning before I could scramble them correctly, my potatoes were burnt, the cheese wouldn’t melt correctly, and my onions just weren’t chopped right. But after finding that balance of ingredients with the help of a few shoves from my fellow students, I found in OCU the ingredient I was missing. It was the ingredient that I needed most: Spam. My entire theme this semester has been Spam, and I apologize if that got annoying to anyone, but it really helped me stay focused. Thanks to everyone who commented and made our trip last week one of the best memories in my life!

spam spam spam spam

Spamming the Gratitude: Director of the Honors Program

Dear Mr. Director,

I don’t feel comfortable displaying people’s names online, but all of us in English 1027 know who you are. I wanted to spam you a great deal of gratitude for arranging the trip for us to go to Oklahoma City and meet with our sister class. I had a great time meeting face to face with the young men and women I’d been corresponding via WordPress with for an entire semester. There was no way to anticipate the true appearance or personality of the individual behind each blog of an English class, so it would be a red herring argument to discuss my personal expectations, but I can say that I hope to continue to learn about the OCU students I met, and I might spam their blogs every once in a while for old times’ sake.

Since there were nine of us who traveled to Oklahoma, we each adopted a name from the Fellowship of the Ring. I was Gimli. The student dubbed Legolas drew these letters with his foot on our guided tour with a few of the OCU students. I think the general consensus of our class is that this picture captures the purpose and the benefits of our trip in six simple letters: AUM and OCU students meeting to form lasting bonds of friendship and understanding in matters of academia and of culture and unity. I made several new friends on this trip, and you are one of them, Mr. Director. And now I spam my gratitude to you.

spam spam spam spam

Loeffler Spam

The map I received from Oklahoma City University was Loeffler’s Magic by Mountains of Discovery. She created a map of the Dawson-Loeffler Science and Mathematics Building on the OCU campus. From what I gathered, she decided on this location because many people were unaware of its existence, and as a Science major, she felt obliged to share the location. I was very happy to receive this map to observe because I am a Mathematics major, and I can easily understand how a Science and Mathematics building can be overlooked even by people who pass by it every single day. I think it’s important for students majoring in other fields to realize that we do exist, especially since we’re smothered by overwhelming amounts of students in other majors and we need to take many of their classes. They’re kind of like the spam in my email accounts. It’s only fair that they see Math and Science majors do exist somewhere in the great beyond.

The map shows two floors of the building in vertical alignment with the first floor on the bottom and the second floor on the top. This is a meaningful choice because it displays a three dimensional object in the most accurate way possible for a two dimensional representation. The angles and measurements are crisp and precise, and it’s easy to see which rooms align vertically. The outer structure of the rooms actually fold out to reveal a detailed map on an inside paper. There are drawings in each room to allow readers to visualize the purpose of each room as denoted on the key at the top. Examples include labs which turn ordinary chemicals into useful objects such as electronics, clothing, and even cash, classrooms with smart boards which project information directly into the minds of students, and offices which teleport students into other worlds. This last one seems so real to me every time I visit the office of my advisor or any form of authority within a school system. I never know what to expect when visiting an educator on his or her own turf about grades, extracurricular activities, class scheduling, or campus events. Each time it’s a completely different experience, and no two office dwellers exist in the same plane of existence. More than a map of the physical building of Science and Mathematics, this map truly captures in great detail the magic that makes the Dawson-Loeffler Science and Mathematics Building exceptional.

If Mountains of Discovery were to read this blog post, I want her to know how much I appreciate studying her map of Loeffler’s Magic and how personal it is because of my major and my interests. It’s the best thing since Spam in a can.

spam spam spam spam

Religious Cult Spams Bomb Threats… This Time it was Real

The time was 9:02. The date was April 19, 1995. It was a day like any other. Children were dropped off for daycare. Office employees arrived to earn their wages and put bread on the table for their families. Customers walked in to ask questions and receive advice. Then everything changed.

4,000 pounds of explosives shook the entire city. One side of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building crumbled upon hundreds of innocent people living their normal lives. Some religious cult with their eccentric views on Christianity decided that it was God’s will to destroy a government building that housed several working class people who simply wanted to make an honest living. They were hurting no one. Unfortunate children were caught in this controversial holy attack on the unrighteousness government of the United States. I firmly believe that this plan included many flaws.

Firstly, this was a local government building that had no influence on the national government that the cult despised. This attack was a wasted effort for their general purpose.

Second, the people within the building were harmless natives of Oklahoma who were doing their jobs for the sake of their families and for the sake of the city. An attack on these people was not only pointless, but it damaged the very essence of Oklahoma City: the residents. The cult achieved the exact opposite what I believe their goal was: hurting the government to improve their own living qualities.

Thirdly, if the cult actually was trying to crush American spirits, again they accomplished the opposite. Indeed the bombing was was a horrific experience for all in the vicinity at the time, the rescuers who bravely entered the scene, Oklahoma City’s residents, and ultimately America as a whole. But if terror was the cult’s intended goal, then they failed epically by their misunderstanding of human nature. In a time of great peril is when heroes can truly be born. Even beyond the acts of valor displayed by average people who lived and worked in the area, Americans – especially Oklahomans – bonded together with hope that could not be broken. True, it is difficult for people to say that they have hope in such terrible times, but each and every one of us who still draw breath hold at least a glimmer of hope for the future. We still bond in times of need, and no cult can break that aspect of human nature, whether they believe it to be God’s will or not. We will always remember those whose lives were fiercely and unjustly taken from them, and we will always fight for a better tomorrow.

I hope a Spam comment isn’t inappropriate for the occasion, but even when all odds are against us, we just need to press on against the terrorists as if we were spam mail in their email accounts.

spam spam spam spam

Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building Spammed with Bomb Threats?

There once existed a federal government complex in downtown Oklahoma City that housed regional offices for agencies such as the Social Security Administration, the United States Secret Service, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, and a few military recruiter offices called the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. A radical white supremacy group called the Covenant, the Sword, and the Arm of the Lord had a vendetta with the United States government for being tolerable of the racial enemies that the CSA strictly described themselves as being against. By the logic of the CSA, friend of my enemy is my enemy, and any who would stand in the way of their religious doctrine that apparently included holy wars against Jews would be eliminated. The CSA began to target the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building after the FBI intervention of the Waco Siege. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (abbreviated ATF) attempted to execute a search warrant at the Branch Davidian ranch at Mount Carmel which was northeast of Waco, Texas. The attempt to execute the warrant resulted in a gun fight between the ATF and the Davidians. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) laid siege against the Davidians to end their mutiny. The Davidians were a religious sect that had ties with the CSA, so the CSA was rather ticked off at the result. They had attempted once already to bomb the federal building in 1983 by parking a van or a trailer in front of the building and blowing it up with rockets detonated by a timer. I wasn’t quite sure of the reasons for this plan, and I didn’t find much about the religious cult’s motives other than antisemitism. I suppose we may never completely understand the thought processes behind unorthodox organizations that have convinced themselves that they are acting for the greater good and a divine purpose. Religion can always be manipulated to force people who put the divine above reason to commit unthinkable crimes if they believe it is God’s will. Spam is always a good idea that doesn’t involve human bloodshed, though. I think I’ll take a break from the doom and gloom and go get some Spam.

spam spam spam spam

Another TED Spam

Today in class, we watched yet another episode of TED Talk. Apparently it is an illegal copyright violation to draw Disney characters on birthday cakes and what not. Two major acts that were discussed are as follows:

Stop Online Piracy Act

Protection of Intellectual Property Act

By the Audio Home Recording Act of 1992, it is okay to tape and remix and share, but not to mass produce and sell. Media gave up on the distinction of legal/illegal acts for copyrighting because citizens had more rights.

The internet is far more popular and more powerful than anyone anticipated. This makes the copyrighting laws extremely difficult to enforce due to the technological nature and copyable property of online works and documents. The real threat to SOPA and PIPA is the capability of us as citizens to copy and share works on a large scale.

If you are an American citizen, you can call a Congressional representative and request to see the cosigners of SOPA and PIPA. They have accumulated millions, so ask not to be considered a thief and to not have the internet broken. If you are not a citizen, ask a citizen to do this process for you.

We should convince Congress to deal with copyright violation as it was dealt with with Napster and YouTube. Maybe then they can stop spamming copyright laws at us.

spam spam spam spam

Map Spam Completed

Mathematical Revolution of Spam Montgomery

Before making changes to the map of Montgomery, it was a very basic, very dull

road map. It displayed and named every street in Montgomery and listed names for most

of the locations in Montgomery that were well traveled. Highways and interstates were

noted in thicker ink and each had several labels for it that were larger than that of other

roads. For people who are not native to Montgomery, this made it easier to navigate the

city by providing references to the most common entrances into the city.

A listing on the back of the map also made it simple to search each specific street

by name. Each street fell into a specific horizontal x value and vertical y value that were

denoted around the edges of the map. The street names on the back were printed with

their corresponding x and y values so that they could be easily found on the map. Each

horizontal and vertical component covered a set length against the border of the map, and

tiny lines led into the map from these values to form a grid that Montgomery resided

within. With knowledge of the street names that one desired to find, the street names on

the back provided enough information to narrow down the location of the desired street

into one square of the grid.

Although the grid system worked well for finding streets by name, scanning the

map for particular locations was a challenge without prior knowledge of the layout of

Montgomery. Every single street name was typed on the map, and the names of many buildings, areas, neighborhoods, parks, and more were also cluttering the picture. From

reading Writing Spaces, it is plausible to conclude that a map printed for the specific

purpose of finding particular locations would be better suited for a reader to skim over to

find such a location than a driving map (4). For what it is intended for, though, the driving

map is an excellent representation. If the reader of the map already had the address of a

destination that needed to be reached, then it would take little effort to use the input street

name to find the output square on the grid that needs to be reached.

A good map to compare the driving map of Montgomery with is the map of

Natural England. This map contains a key which lists icons for Natural England offices,

national nature reserves, local nature reserves, and much more. The icons are chosen such

that when viewed from a perspective which shows the entire continent, the red and blue

dots seem to dominate much of inland England. Perhaps there actually are tons of nature

reserves and such in England, but the map could have been laid out in a way that

exaggerates the amount of nature in England as a little white lie that the book

How to Lie with Maps explains (1). Each part of the map can be clicked for information on

relevant offices or natural locations in the area. The map is easy to use and navigate

through, but as so much programming and complexity are involved in the map, it can be

slow to load at times.

The site is extremely easy to use. Just clicking on a location in the map brings up

all of its information: the name of the location, its identification number, its reference on

the grid, and the names and contact information of the Natural England teams in the area.

Although the buildings and roads are marked on the map, it gives no information or even

names of streets or landmarks other than the parks and natural areas. The only names on the map besides the offices and natural locations themselves are the names of the districts

and cities within England. This is necessary for users of the map to be able to sift through

the different locations and find their destinations city by city. It is not necessary to include

street names as they are provided upon clicking on chosen locations. The map is very

clear of clutter and is not a burden to look at because everything is simple and laid out for

efficiency.

Though the online map of Natural England has a technological advantage over the

physical map of Montgomery, it is intended to provide much more specified information.

Both maps are exceptional for their individual purposes: the map of Montgomery for

finding commonly visited locations via their street addresses, and the map of Natural

England for searching for teams and contact information regarding the natural reserves of

England within each city.

Two of the many types of locations on the Montgomery map in particular that

stood out were cemeteries and public parks. Though schools, hospitals, memorials, and

many other important locations are displayed on the map, the cemeteries seemed to draw

attention and make for great conversational topics, and the parks seemed numerous and

important yet slightly undermined within the original map of Montgomery. That soon

changed.

This is the map of Montgomery after the Mathematical Revolution. Compliments

to the artist’s skill with a highlighter may be few and far between, but mathematicians are

not normally gifted in the fine arts.  A line can be drawn through many of the cemeteries

in Montgomery to display a heart that covers most of the map. Many of the parks can be

connected to form the visage of a dragon, though the slightly less than par skills of this particular artist may not have captured that correctly. Regardless of whether the point

came across just right, the cemeteries and parks played into the Mathematical Revolution

of Montgomery.

Many of the cemeteries in Montgomery converge to shape a heart that surrounds

most of the center of Montgomery. Montgomery has an integral history within America.

It is the capital of Alabama, which was and still remains the largest state provider of

cotton since Daniel Pratt’s industrialization of the South. When the South decided to

secede from the rest of the country, Montgomery was chosen as the first capital of the

newly formed Confederate States of America.

Even after the rebellion was stamped out in the Civil War, Montgomery has still

been a proud city of famed history that is recognized throughout the world. Rosa Parks

decided on December 1st of 1955 that she would not give up her seat at the front of a bus

for a white passenger. Martin Luther King, Jr. had a dream in Montgomery that he shared

in Washington, D.C. August 28th, 1963. Montgomery was the seat of Civil Rights that

Americans still celebrate and strive to better. Many of the cemeteries in Montgomery

are dedicated to such historical figures as Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr. It is not

surprising that these cemeteries – the physical representations that hold the memories of

Montgomery’s history including industrialization, rebellion, and Civil Rights – make up

the symbolic and even the physical heart of the city of Montgomery. In this map on

Google maps, the historical cemeteries that Google decided to mark show this physical

representation of the Heart of Montgomery. The importance of Montgomery’s history has

not only shaped the lives of the residents of Alabama, but it has affected the hearts of

millions worldwide by stressing the value of equality that America is grounded in.
An essay called Public Park History found online explains much of the origins of

public parks, their uses, and their importance. Early in European history, parks were

established for four main non-agricultural purposes: domestic pleasure, exercise, hunting,

and meetings or celebrations. Today in America, the most common use of public parks is

for the first of these: domestic pleasure. Children and pets alike enjoy the simple

pleasures of a large, open space where they can run and play and bask in the fresh air and

sunlight. Since the Industrial Revolution that is defined in the Encyclopedia Britannica

online, parks emerged as somewhat of an escape from the technologically enhanced urban

areas congested with factories and railroads.

Whereas European monarchs and nobles of Medieval times set up private park

boundaries often for sport or show of their wealth, the rise of technology encouraged the

opening of parks to the public so that the natural world would not be completely lost to

the hustle and bustle of city life. Parks are somewhat of a restorative property that

reminds humans where they come from and what nature’s beauty really looks like. As

simple as that may seem, without the natural aspects introduced by public parks into

urban settings to ease the human conscience, it would be second nature to get lost in

technology and forget the importance of the natural world in the ecosystem which rules

all species indiscriminately. Even humanity can fall to an unbalance in the smallest and

least noticed of life forms on the planet.

To honor the importance of public parks, many of Montgomery’s parks have been

highlighted on the map. Oddly enough, with a bit of imagination, it appears as if many of

the parks on the map could connect to form a sort of constellation of a dragon. Perhaps it

can be linked to the importance of nature. If the parks are disturbed or mistreated, then
the dragon will awake and devastate the ecosystem. To avoid this catastrophe, proper care

must be offered for the dragon. Otherwise, the dragon will awaken to open and cook the

can of Spam which is Montgomery.

The next part of the Mathematical Revolution was inspired by the French

Revolution. The following summary of the French Revolution is courtesy of the World

History 1020 class taught by a professor of Auburn University in Montgomery.

Christianity was overthrown in France in 1789. This revolt against Christianity

was not necessarily due to Atheism or conflicting religions of the French citizens, but it

was more an attempt to free themselves from the oppression, manipulation, and

absolutism of the Catholic church and the rule of the monarch. Christianity at the time

was abused by the monarchies of Europe by justifying the rule of kings by Divine Right.

It was the monarch’s birthright to be the absolute ruler of a nation because he was born to

the ruling family. Kings answered to God and God alone. No mortal could challenge the

authority of a king because it was supposed to have been given him by God. Tyranny was

rampant. Justice was defined only as the king said it was defined. Since medieval times,

certain heroic figures rose to recognition by great deeds. The families of renowned

knights and distinguished military minds who aided kings in solidifying their power were

raised to the status of nobility. Certain men of God would be called to the clergy to

participate in retaining the divine authority of the king. The clergy and the nobility made

up the First and Second Estates of France, which was only about 2% of the population.

The vast majority of France was the Third Estate, comprised of farmers and other

working class families. It was the role of the Third Estate to work their entire lives and

give nearly all of their earnings to the top 2% of the population. No one was allowed to
question this system because the king and the First and Second Estates earned their

authority and privilege by Divine Right.

In 1776, America pulled a stunt that changed the world. America declared

independence from England. They rallied forces from across the vast continent of North

America to defend their self-declared independence from the island nation of England

that essentially founded America via colonization. The French were called upon to assist

the Americans in preserving their newly established country. After knocking the British

on their buttocks, the French returned to France with revolution on their minds. America

defeated the very country that it was born from in the name of liberty and equality. Surely

the French could rally up enough people to overthrow the king and the first two estates.

After all, it was 98% of France against 2%…

Long story short, France revolted. They overthrew royal absolutism and

established their own democratic government much as America had done a few short

years prior. They rid the country of any semblance of the Christianity which oppressed

them, changing the calendar to fit a secular schedule based on ten day weeks and months

named after the characteristics of the weather at the time. They demolished churches and

religious statues that would only remind them of their painful past. The streets that

included Saint or any religious name or term in their names were renamed. Much as the

French replaced the tyranny that Christianity had become in their country with ideals of

brotherly love and royal absolutism with absolute equality, so have the names of Saint

streets in Alabama been replaced with names of the world’s greatest mathematicians.

Again, this is not a movement against Christianity. It is a movement against the tyranny

that corrupt people are manipulating Christianity to be. Great intellectuals are much more stable in mind and in procedure than many of today’s self-proclaimed saints. Isaac

Newton himself proved the existence of God in his studies of Physics and Astronomy,

even if his discoveries contradicted the beliefs that the Catholic Church held to be true.

Newton Park in Prattville, Alabama is dedicated to Isaac Newton, the father of

Calculus and Physics. The streets in Prattville and Montgomery that include Saint (or St.)

at the beginning of their names have been renamed to honor some of the best

mathematicians to ever walk the Earth. Euclid was an ancient Greek mathematician who

was the first to prove that there are infinite prime numbers in existence. Archimedes was

a student of Euclid’s school who was an early anticipator of Calculus and developed by

far the closest calculation of pi in his era. Carl Gauss was a German mathematician who

wrote the Disquisitiones Arithmeticae. Leonhard Euler developed the world’s modern

trigonometry. Bernhard Riemann had poor health and died young, but he inspired the

development of Physics. Henri Poincaré was the father of Topology, but he also did much

work in other fields. Joseph Lagrange was a master of both Number Theory and Analysis.

David Hilbert founded the Formalist school of Mathematics and developed a new system

of definitions and axioms for geometry that replaced the 2,200 year-old system of Euclid.

Gottfried Leibniz was a philosopher, lawyer, historian, diplomat, and renowned inventor

on top of being a famed mathematician who discovered and proved an identity of pi.

Alexandre Grothendieck is famous for his methods to unify different branches of

Mathematics and for proving the Weil Conjectures with his student Pierre Deligne. The

works of these mathematicians and more can be found on the webpage of the Greatest

Mathematicians of All Time.

Each of the aforementioned mathematicians were phenomenal. There were many other men of such caliber that were not mentioned here, also. Mathematicians are among

the most brilliant people who have ever lived, and the Mathematical Revolution is a step

toward the right direction for Montgomery. Instead of basing their lives purely on the

teachings and advice of religious leaders who may or may not be just and righteous,

Christians can learn for themselves the true nature of genius and calculate their own

theories of religion based on their own walks. The Mathematical Revolution is not just

for Christians, though. All peoples can learn and grow from the History that surrounds

them, the nature from which they came and are forever a part of, and the Mathematics

that can inspire greatness in any mind.
Works Cited

Allen, James. The Greatest Mathematicians of All Time. n.p. 2012. Web. 03 Apr. 2012.

Anonymous AUM student. Mathematical Revolution of Montgomery. 2012. Auburn University in Montgomery, Montgomery.

Anonymous AUM teacher. World History 1020, Auburn University in Montgomery, Montgomery, AL,     n.d. Lecture.

Encyclopedia Britannica. Encyclopedia Britannica Inc., 2012. Web. 03 Apr. 2012

Klein, Michael, and Shackelfordand, Kristi. “Beyond Black on White: Document Design     and Formatting in the Writing Classroom.” Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing,     Volume 2. Library of Congress, 2011. Web. 03 Apr. 2012.

Monmonier, Mark. How to Lie with Maps. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press,     1996. Print.

Montgomery. Racine: Seeger Ma[, 2008. Print.

Nature on the Map. Natural England, 2012. Web. 03 Apr. 2012.

“Public Park History.” Gardenvisit. Garden Visit, 2008. Web. 03 Apr. 2012.

“Spam.” Spam. Spam, 2012. Can. Everyday.                                                                          spam spam spam spam

Map Spam: Natural England

I found an interactive online map of Natural England.

This map of Natural England contains a key which lists icons for Natural England offices, national nature reserves, local nature reserves, and much more. The icons are chosen such that when viewed from a perspective which shows the entire continent, the red and blue dots seem to dominate much of inland England. Perhaps there actually are tons of nature reserves and such in England, but the map could have been laid out in a way that exaggerates the amount of nature in England as a little white lie that the book How to Lie with Maps explains. Each part of the map can be clicked for information on relevant offices or natural locations in the area. The map is easy to use and navigate through, but as so much programming and complexity are involved in the map, it can be slow to load at times.

The site is extremely easy to use. Just clicking on a location in the map brings up all of its information: the name of the location, its identification number, its reference on the grid, and the names and contact information of the Natural England teams in the area. Although the buildings and roads are marked on the map, it gives no information or even names of streets or landmarks other than the parks and natural areas. The only names on the map besides the offices and natural locations themselves are the names of the districts and cities within England. This is necessary for users of the map to be able to sift through the different locations and find their destinations city by city. It is not necessary to include street names as they are provided upon clicking on chosen locations. The map is very clear of clutter and is not a burden to look at because everything is simple and laid out for efficiency.

It’s almost as efficient as a can of Spam is filling.

spam spam spam spam